While mystery surrounds what happened to Amelia Earhart 75 years ago when she was flying around the world, her accessories, including the scarf below pictured with her lucky bracelet, made trips around the world on space missions

After Circling Earth, Amelia Earhart’s Scarf Returns Home

In What's New, People by Accessories Staff

While mystery surrounds what happened to Amelia Earhart 75 years ago when she was flying around the world, her accessories, including the scarf below pictured with her lucky bracelet, made trips around the world on space missions

While mystery surrounds what happened to Amelia Earhart 75 years ago when she was flying around the world, her accessories, including the scarf below pictured with her lucky bracelet, made trips around the world on space missions

Oklahoma City—Famed aviatrix Amelia Earhart disappeared while attempting to fly around the world, but her scarf–which circled the earth last November–is going “home” on Saturday.

NASA astronaut Randy Bresnik had borrowed Earhart’s scarf from the 99s Museum of Women Pilots to take along on Atlantis space shuttle mission last November. Bresnik made the request to honor Earhart and his grandfather, Albert, who was Earhart friend and official photographer.

“Because of my grandfather’s connection to Amelia and our shared love of flight, I always dreamed of honoring her memory in a spectacular way,” said Bresnik. “My grandfather went nearly everywhere with Earhart. Fortunately he wasn’t with her on her last flight, or I might not be here today.”

At a special event Saturday at the Oklahoma City-based museum, Earhart’s scarf will be returned to one of the largest collections of her personal belongings, which include her lucky bracelet, one she wore on every flight except for her last.

 

Ironically, this isn’t the first of Earhart’s accessories that have made the trip around the earth 75 years after she disappeared over the Pacific Ocean while trying to be the first woman pilot to fly around the world.

The museum has at least one other of Earhart’s worn scarves and it too has been carried into space. Eileen Collin, the first American woman to pilot and command the space shuttle flew that scarf on her first mission in 1995. Another scarf belonging to Perdue University flew on the 1990 mission to deploy the Hubble Space Telescope.

Last week, astronaut Shannon Walker, one of the six-person Expedition 24, crew, brought Earhart’s watch aboard the International Space Station. That event occurred 47 years after the first woman entered space and was one day shy of the 27th anniversary of the first U.S. woman in space.

Noting the mystery of Earhart’s disappearance 75 years ago while she was flying around the world, Carolyn Smith, chairman of the 99s Museum of Women Pilots, says it is fitting that the scarf and watch made the trip that Earhart didn’t.

“Amelia’s finally come full-circle. I think she would be proud,” Smith added. Musuemofwomenpilots.com

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