Week in Review: 10 Must-Read Articles

Clover leaf ball gown, 1953 from Metropolitan Museum of Art's "Charles James: Beyond Fashion."

Clover leaf ball gown, 1953 from Metropolitan Museum of Art’s “Charles James: Beyond Fashion.”

New York–This week was chock full of interesting, useful information if you were paying attention, that is.

In a special report examining global value chain, the National Retail Federation found that many American consumers don’t know that imported goods with foreign labels often include a “significant but unrevealed amounts of U.S. content.”

Made in China?…USA?

“Even in a product that says ‘Made in China,’ much of what goes into that product is ‘Made in America,’” says NRF President Matthew Shay. “That means millions of American jobs for American workers regardless of what the label might say.”

Reporting on its Luxury Consumption Index, Unity Marketing said that the nation’s most affluent consumers describe themselves as being in a “holding pattern with 61% of the more than 1,400 affluent consumers surveyed saying they expect their level of spending on luxury goods and services to remain the same over the next 12 months.”

Overall retail sales in April proved strong, surprisingly so. Of course, some of those sales had been pushed from March into April due to the later Easter this year. Economists say that May could be the first real indicator of how retail sales are trending this year—provided there’s no storms, disasters etc. to keep shoppers at bay.

For a look at interesting facts from 10 top online stories, read the following:

April Retail Comp Sales Jump Past Estimates

Target CEO Departs in Wake of Data Breach

Austerity Looms in Luxury Market: Study

Barbara Rentler to Succeed Michael Balmuth as Ross Stores CEO

Met’s Costume Institute Gala Goes Very Formal This Year

Perfect Match? Lux Accessories Sees Opportunity in nOir Jewelry

Judge Upholds West Hollywood Law Banning Fur Sales

AAFA Bows Database for U.S.-Made Manufacturing

Report: Imports are More “Made in USA” Than Label Reveals

May Imports Continue to Rise Ahead of Port Labor Negotiations

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