Mad About Jewelry? Don’t Miss LOOT at the Museum of Arts and Design

 Designer Danielle Gori-Montanelli’s felt necklace: her pieces evolve organically as she plays with the colors and forms of  accumulating layers.

Designer Danielle Gori-Montanelli’s felt necklace: her pieces evolve organically as she plays with the colors and forms of accumulating layers.

New York, NY–Mad about jewelry? Well, the Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) is the place for you this week.

Beginning tomorrow through Saturday, Oct. 5, MAD is holding its annual exhibition and sale of one-of-a kind, artist-made jewelry called LOOT 2013: Mad About Jewelry.

Now in its 13th year, LOOT has become the ultimate pop-up shop for contemporary studio and art jewelry, offering the public the rare opportunity to meet some of the most innovative jewelry artists in the world and directly acquire pieces from them. This year more than 50 jewelry artists from 20 countries are represented along with work by two recent graduates of Pratt Institute’s acclaimed studio jewelry program. Proceeds from the show benefit the Museum’s exhibition and education programs.

More Than 50 Designers from 20 Countries

“LOOT has become a premier jewelry shopping experience in New York. There is no other event that offers the public a chance to see such a wide variety of expressive and original jewelry from around the world, meet the artists—and maybe take home a piece or two for their own collection,” says Michele Cohen, LOOT Chair. “LOOT builds on MAD’s longstanding history of presenting contemporary art jewelry. We are delighted to bring so many artists into the Museum and so much new work to the public through this event.”

Curator Bryna Pomp selected participating artists based on their originality, use of materials, and expert craftsmanship. Among the artists featured will be famed jeweler Eva Steinberg, known for her exceptional Art Nouveau-inspired jewelry; up-and-coming designer Stephan Hampala, whose intricately beaded jewelry evokes a textile quality; and Yoko Shimizu, whose bold and colorful work in resin is occasionally inspired by the organic qualities of wood. LOOT 2013 will feature stunning art jewelry by Pratt Institute alumnae Jenna Pierson and Samantha Nania from their senior thesis collections.

Countries represented at LOOT 2013 include Argentina, Denmark, Indonesia, Japan, Poland, South Africa, South Korea, and the United Kingdom. A wide variety of materials will be showcased, including traditional ones like 18K gold, sterling silver, bronze, titanium, aluminum, pearls, and semiprecious stones to more unusual ones like 3D printed nylon, glass, felt, porcelain, volcanic lava, recycled rope, fossils, and industrial springs.

Tribute to Icons Iris Apfel, Barbara Berger

Constructing jewelry from small building blocks, artist Jo Hayes Ward creates elegant pieces with an architectural aesthetic.. Her jewels incorporate complex textured and patterned surfaces, reflecting light in multiple directions.

Constructing jewelry from small building blocks, artist Jo Hayes Ward creates elegant pieces with an architectural aesthetic. Her jewels incorporate complex textured and patterned surfaces, reflecting light in multiple directions.

As part of this year’s festivities, the Museum will honor two fashion icons who are known for their outstanding jewelry collections: Iris Apfel and Barbara Berger. The two will be recognized with the 2013 2013 LOOT Award for Contemporary Art Jewelry at the Opening Benefit Evening on Tuesday night. The Award is presented to luminaries in the field of jewelry, including artists, collectors, and designers

At 91, Apfel continues to be a doyenne of personal style. Regarded as a fashion icon, she is often seen wearing elaborate and colorful costume jewelry as documented by style photographers like The New York Times’ Bill Cunningham. As a young woman, Apfel began her foray into fashion and design working for Women’s Wear Daily. While running a textile firm with her husband, Apfel established herself as an in-demand interior designer, with projects including design restorations at the White House for nine U.S. presidents.

Her friend and fellow award recipient Barbara Berger is a well-known figure among jewelry and fashion enthusiasts. Berger has built an impressive collection of more than 4,000 pieces of fashion jewelry, spanning the past five decades. Highlights include couture jewelry from Yves Saint Laurent, Dior, and Miriam Haskell, are on view in the exhibition “Fashion Jewelry: The Collection of Barbara Berger” at MAD through January 20, 2014. (To purchase tickets call 212.299.7712 or visit: http://thestore.madmuseum.org/collections/loot-2013)

A Museum-wide Jewelry Day will take place on the last day of the exhibition, Saturday, Oct. 5 from 12:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m., and will offer panels on contemporary art jewelry, drop-in workshops, screenings, curator-led tours and a roster of some of the most exciting local artists and designers creating jewelry in the MAD Open Studios.

A Selection of Participating Artists

Michael Berger (Germany) – Berger’s hand-made collections feature kinetic rings that spin on the wearer’s hand.

Dania Chelminsky (Israel) – Chelminsky works with contrasting materials, textures, and shapes, using pearl, gold, cameo and resin in unexpected ways to create elegant and modern pieces with a bold and feminine style.

Fabien Ifirès (France) – Ifirès, who worked previously as a leather artisan for a luxury atelier, is known for combining modern and traditional saddler techniques to create his jewelry collection of cuffs, necklaces, and earrings.

So Won Joo (Korea) – Drawing inspiration from nature, So Won Joo knits gold and silver wires to craft sheer, sculptural jewelry.

Claire Kahn (USA) – A former graphic designer for Skidmore, Owings, and Merrill, and designer of innovative fountains such as the one in New York’s Columbus Circle, Kahn’s studio work now includes jewelry. She crochets beads, stone, silver and gold to construct a linear mosaic on long, flexible ropes, which allows the wearer to wrap them around in layers to make a necklace their own.

Jane Macintosh (UK) – Inspired by the Bauhaus movement, Macintosh crafts one-off, simple yet bold, jewelry using traditional goldsmithing skills. She combines silver with gold or palladium and uses a matte finish to bring out the subtle tones and colors.

Gerda and Nikolai Monies (Denmark)–The Danish duo makes dramatic, sculptural jewelry that amplify the materials they use. They work with a wide variety of materials including wood, semiprecious stones, horn and pearls.

Michihiro Sato (Japan)–By meticulously carving, coloring, and stacking layers of paper, Sato creates pendants and adornments that bloom and burst with lines and soft curves.

David and Roberta Williamson (USA) – The Williamsons are known for nature-themed jewelry that use ephemera and found objects, some of which were passed down in their families. Juxtaposing various objects, they build intricate jewelry to evoke personal histories and memories.

The main theme of Camilla Teglio’s work is decoration. Her pieces include an array of textures and patterns, created using a variety of techniques and materials. In her Blue collection, Teglio combines layers of colors, paper, and patterns, melted together until they become something new.

The main theme of Camilla Teglio’s work is decoration. Her pieces include an array of textures and patterns, created using a variety of techniques and materials. In her Blue collection, Teglio combines layers of colors, paper, and patterns, melted together until they become something new.

LOOT 2013 is made possible in part through the generous support of Barbara Tober, Chairman Emerita and Chairman Global Leadership Council, Museum of Arts and Design; and the Silver Institute: Silver Promotion Service.

About the Museum of Arts and Design

The Museum of Arts and Design’s collection of contemporary and modern studio and art jewelry documents the development of studio jewelry from its origins in the post-World War II era to the present day and includes more than 600 jewelry pieces ranging from the pioneering work of early American Studio Jewelers, such as Margaret De Patta and Sam Kramer, to the groundbreaking and nontraditional methods of contemporary artists like Peter Chang and Joyce Scott.

MAD is the only American museum with a gallery dedicated to contemporary and modern studio and art jewelry, featuring both temporary jewelry exhibitions and installations from the permanent collection, which it began assembling soon after its founding in 1956.

The Museum focuses on the ways in which artists and designers transform the world around us, through processes ranging from the artisanal to the digital. MAD’s exhibition program is dedicated to creativity and craftsmanship, and demonstrates the limitless potential of materials and techniques when used by gifted and innovative artists.

www.madmuseum.org

Like this? Share it!