Project Have Hope Features Contemporary Ugandan Accessories

Project Have Hope recycled paper bangles from Uganda

Project Have Hope recycled paper bangles from Uganda

Malden, Mass.—Who doesn’t want to support an organization that has the word hope in its name?

Project Have Hope is a fair trade organization that empowers female artisans from the Acholi Quarter in Uganda. What started with rolled paper beads has turned into a broader line, featuring jewelry as well as home goods and textile accessories such as headbands, yoga mat bags and backpacks.

Since its inception, Project Have Hope has accomplished:

  • Sponsorship of more than 100 children in school
  • Loans to 76 entrepreneurs
  • Vocational training for 32 women
  • Adult literacy classes for 22 women
  • Agricultural programs

“What makes Project Have Hope stand apart is its focus on helping individuals,” says founder and director Karen Sparacio. “It’s not about tossing charity money at a desperate situation, but working with the community so that women can pull themselves out of poverty. It invests the profits in the women’s future: their careers and their children’s education.”

Fair trade companies always have the challenge to create merchandise that remains true to the country’s artisan aesthetic, yet is also welcome to a fashion-savvy consumer in Western countries. Project Have Hope has struck the right balance.

For more information, go to Projecthavehope.org

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Lauren Parker, Accessories Magazine

Lauren Parker, Editor-in-Chief, Accessories Magazine
As Editor-in-Chief of Accessories Magazine for the past 12 years, Lauren Parker has covered accessories both from a retail business perspective and a fashion point of view. In previous full-time magazine jobs and freelance gigs, she’s written about practically every angle of fashion lifestyle living, including women's fashion accessories, fine jewelry, Caribbean travel, private jets, Hampton’s real estate, the New York art scene, the bridal industry, men’s lifestyle and being a mom. She loves meeting designers and seeing how their latest offerings capture the current zeitgeist and fit into the entire cultural and social picture.