Gucci Appeals Italian Court’s Ruling in Dispute with Guess

Gucci-vs-Guess_2226524a-300x300Milan—Gucci is set to appeal a judgment in its ongoing trademark battle against Guess in Italy.

The company today said it remains “surprised and disappointed with the outcome of the first instance sentence handed down by the Court of Milan.”

It added that the decision is radically opposed and contradictory to the sentence handed down in the United States in a parallel case. In that case, a New York court found in favor of Gucci in 2012 and awarded the company $4.7 million in damages for Guess’ breach of its signatures—although later this was decreased to $456,183.

In May, the Court of Milan rejected a series of claims bought by Gucci, as well as cancelling some of Gucci’s diamond pattern, G Logo and Flora pattern trademarks. It also rejected Gucci’s rights to the square G logo.

The court also found the popular Guess Quattro G logo pattern (also with a single G in the corner of the diamond) has “nothing to do” with Gucci’s interlocking double G pattern.

In a statement issued today, Gucci said it is requesting the Court of Milan decision be overturned and all its claims of “brand infringement and unfair and parasitic competition against Guess be admitted.”

The company believes the appeal is necessary to protect its “historic wealth of iconic, distinctive signs, famous the world over, and, more generally, to protect the values of creativity and innovation of quality ‘Made in Italy’ products.”

Gucci also said that contrary to claims made by Guess, it has had various contacts and meetings with the U.S. firm and its lawyers to settle their differences out of court.

“The serious nature and extent of Guess’s alleged breaches, however, together with its unwillingness to look for a serious and reasonable solution have rendered all attempts at settlement vain,” Gucci said in a statement.

 

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