Study: Top 10 Cities with ‘Messiest Sock Drawers’

Dallas—Why in the world would anyone study which cities have citizens who have the messiest and the most organized sock drawers?

Well, the folks at dating website Chemistry.com are interested in such obscure facts—especially as they relate to characteristics of a potential partner.

In its blog The Spark, the website makes the case for why someone with a messy sock drawer may reveal more than, say, a birth sign.

In fact,  “people who often come across as being structured and detail-oriented (“Builders” as they are called at Chemistry.com) are often the ones with the most disorganized socks.

”An organized sock drawer can reveal a lot about a person’s personality and biology,” says Dr. Helen Fisher, biological anthropologist and chief scientific advisor to Chemistry.com.

“From my studies on temperament with Chemistry.com, I have found that the Builder type (expressive of serotonin) who are typically orderly, conventional, respectful of the rules and detail-oriented have, in fact, the messiest sock drawers.”

And, according to this study, these Builder types tend to live in medium-sized towns in the South and Midwest.

(No word, however, on what it means to be a victim of the single sock syndrome: you know, when you wash and dry your laundry only to find one of the socks has disappeared.)

Cities with the Messiest Sock Drawers:

1. Charleston, West Virginia

2. Cedar Rapids, Iowa

3. Fort Smith, Arkansas

4. Paducah, Kentucky

5. Little Rock Arkansas

6. South Bend, Indiana

7. Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

8. Birmingham, Alabama

9. Huntsville, Alabama

10. Des Moines, Iowa

 

The 10 U.S. cities with the most organized sock drawers based on Chemistry.com’s research are:

   1. Miami, Florida

   2. West Palm Beach, Florida

   3. Ft. Meyers, Florida

   4. Tampa, Florida

   5. Orlando, Florida

   6. San Diego, California

   7. Las Vegas, Nevada

   8. New York, New York

   9. Los Angeles, Los Angeles

  10. Phoenix, Arizona

 

About Chemistry.com

Launched by Match.com in February 2006, online dating site Chemistry.com was created to bring together singles that are looking for ways to discover if true chemistry exists before meeting on the first date. Based on the research of renowned biological anthropologist Dr. Helen Fisher, Chemistry.com uses a proprietary test to get to know each individual and their ideal match. This approach makes Chemistry.com the ideal place for singles to empower their love life and find the relationship that is right for each individual, whether it’s marriage, romance, a partnership or a long-term commitment

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